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Why Do French Bulldogs Fart So Much? Causes and Solutions

The French bulldog is characterised by a particular conformation of its muzzle, which causes it to ingest a lot of air during meals. This physical characteristic is often the cause of the bulldog’s annoying ‘farts’.

Flatulence occurs when gas accumulates in the intestines.

French bulldog flatulence. Silent, or definitely loud, and always deadly, dog farts are not just something to joke about and can make life with your dog decidedly tricky and embarrassing, especially when we have guests.

Who among us has not at least once encountered that meme explaining the abilities of three dog breeds? The third one is usually an English bulldog who proudly declares he is a skilled fart. We smiled because at least a couple of times, we’re sure, you’ve all ‘experienced’ what it’s like to stand next to a puppy or adult English bulldog expelling air from the rear.

It makes you smile because, put like that, flatulence in dogs can be considered just a minor annoyance, whereas it can be a symptom of more severe problems.

French Bulldog fart. Causes and Solutions

French Bulldog fart. Causes and Solutions.
Farting can be due to any gastrointestinal problem or food intolerance.

Why does the French Bulldog fart so much? Flatulence in French Bulldogs can be pretty annoying. If you have a Frenchie, you may wonder why French Bulldog farts are so often smelly.

It may not be the most pleasant topic, but there is valuable information about why this happens so often and what to do about it.

Your French Bulldog farts a lot, and you must know why. I can’t blame you!

While this doesn’t happen to all Frenchies, and it’s not always so regular, a lot of times it is, and the smell can be so bad you may think there is a more significant issue. But, on the other hand, it knows why it may help you feel better about yourself as a pet owner.

Gas Flatulence  

Flatulence occurs when gas accumulates in the intestines. The gas is created when intestinal bacteria process the dog’s food. Gas formation is very normal, but gas must also leave the body. This often happens in the form of a badly-smelling fart.

Keep in mind that, like humans, this happens to every dog. While French Bulldog farts are extra smelly, farts are not exclusive to Frenchies. Older dogs experience flatulence more than younger dogs. Occasional passing of gas is normal. It would be best to consider why and treatment when it becomes persistent and extra smelly. 

Food sensitivity or allergy 

Regular flatulence can indicate that your Frenchie is sensitive to a particular food. For example, many dogs are sensitive or allergic to beef protein, chicken meat, or dairy.

If this is the case with your Frenchie, their gastrointestinal tract gets upset, resulting in a bubbled belly, flatulence, and sometimes diarrhoea after consuming one of these foods.

This can manifest in skin complaints, such as itching and rash.

If you are giving your Frenchie table food, your dog is undoubtedly sensitive to these foods. In addition, many of our meals are unsuitable for the dog’s stomach. Dogs’ stomachs do not agree with our food’s ingredients, making it spicy, sweet, or salty. Be sure you are giving your appropriate dog food; more on that later.

Other Stomach issues 

Unfortunately, French Bulldog farts can indicate an irritated or inflamed intestinal tract. If symptoms persist for over a week, your dog starts to have diarrhoea, or your dog’s stool has blood in it, immediately contact your veterinarian.

Gobbling 

Frenchie Breed recommends that Slow Feeder Dog Bowl be made of non-toxic, eco-friendly material.
Still worry about your dogs eating too fast? As we know, speedy eaters are more likely to experience bloat, regurgitation, and indigestible. The feeding dog bowls are designed to solve all these issues: slow the meal time up to 10 times compared to a typical dog bowl, efficiently prevent overeating, choking, and vomiting, form good eating behaviour and make every meal full of challenge and fun.

Some dogs eat very quickly or gobble, and doing this causes them to gulp air. Then, air bubbles travel through the oesophagus, stomach, and intestines before leaving again as a strong and sometimes smelly “wind”. A slow feed bowl is an excellent option if your Frenchie is a gobbler.

French Bulldog fart, keep an eye on its Nutrition. 

Food is a massive component of flatulence. French Bulldog farts, and all dogs for that matter, are more prevalent when their diet consists of many soybeans, peas, dairy, and high-fat products. Check ingredients and change food if needed. Remember that dogs should not consume dairy.

Is my dog in pain? 

When French Bulldogs fart, they are releasing built-up gas. As this passes through them, they may experience discomfort or stomach cramps in their belly, just like humans.

We can sometimes tell if they are not feeling right by their behaviour. For example, they may either start acting out or eat unusual objects. Remember, our fur babies have no words to express their feelings. So, if you notice these behaviours, consult your vet.

How can I make it stop? 

To resolve long-term flatulence in French Bulldogs, you should most importantly consider its diet. You can ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is my dog’s food easy to digest?
  • Is this food complete with essential vitamins and minerals?
  • Does the food contain a lot of starch or grains?
  • Does my dog also have flatulence with other types of food?
  • Is my dog perhaps allergic or hypersensitive?
  • Does my dog have any more complaints?

A well-fed French bulldog has a healthy gastrointestinal tract and a robust immune system. Yet, no dog is the same when it comes to food.

One performs best with a particular type of high-quality kibble; another may best digest fresh meat. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different kinds of food. Your dog’s sensitivity to a specific food type does not mean he has to use hypoallergenic food.

Changing my Frenchie’s diet 

Are you going to change your Frenchie’s diet? If so, do this gradually because dogs’ gastrointestinal tract is sensitive and needs time to get used to it. Then, you can mix the new food with less and less of the old food until their meal consists of only fresh food.

Give new foods or diets a couple of weeks before concluding whether they work. This allows for a proper adjustment time. If the problem gets worse, you should return to the old diet. Contact your vet if it worsens or persists at the same rate.

Can I prevent French Bulldog Fart So Much?

Dick Van Patten's Natural Balance is a line of pet food and treats created by actor and animal advocate Dick Van Patten. The company's mission is to provide the highest quality, natural pet food that is both nutritious and delicious.
Natural Balance products contain real, whole ingredients, including fruits, vegetables, and meats. They are also free of artificial flavours, colours, and preservatives.

French Bulldog farts can be so displeasing to the human family members and may also not be pleasant to your pup, so it’s ideal for preventing it in the first place. But, again, diet is crucial and is usually the best way to avoid flatulence in the first place.

For most dogs, avoiding people’s food, dairy, and bad carbs (soy, corn, and wheat) is the key to a proper diet.

As soon as you get your new Frenchie, look for foods with these ingredients:

  • Protein
  • Good carbohydrates and grains from fruit, vegetables, rice, oats, and barley
  • Healthy fats found in meat and oils (omega-3, omega-6, fish oils)
  • Vitamins and Minerals
  • Water

Some dogs may need limited-ingredient foods like this one by Natural Balance.

Avoid foods with the following:

  • Extracts from meat: Choose food with real meat
  • Preservatives (BHA and BHT)
  • Artificial colours (Blue 2, Red 40, Yellow 5 and 6, 4-MIE)
  • Gluten
  • Corn syrup
  • White flour

It may be inevitable that your senior Frenchie will fart more than you’d like. This is because older dogs’ bodies become less able to process and digest certain foods. In this case, please provide them with the best food you can. And always contact your vet if you need to.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

Affiliate Disclosure: The Frenchie Breed website may receive a small commission from the proceeds of any product(s) sold through affiliate and direct partner links at no cost to you.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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