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The Loyal Weimaraner: A Complete Breed Guide for Prospective Owners

Ideal for those who want an active large-breed dog for hunting, hiking, and other outdoor activities, the Weimaraner is a great companion. It is brilliant and requires involvement in various activities to prevent destructive behaviour.

The Weimaraner is an active dog that requires an appropriate level of physical activity due to its hunting qualities.

Weimaraner dog breed guide. The Weimaraner is considered the oldest German hunting dog breed and is still a versatile and enthusiastic hunting dog today. But this aristocratic dog, with its shiny silver-grey coat and proud expression, is also becoming increasingly popular outside the circle of hunting enthusiasts. Nevertheless, the family should only keep it if offered sufficient alternative activities.

Origin

The Weimaraner breed appeared in a Van Dyke painting from the early 1600s. The breed is believed to originate from a population similar to the German Short-haired Pointer, with the introduction of the Bloodhound through crosses with one or more of the various schweisshund breeds. The breed takes its name from the court of Karl August, Grand Duke of Weimar, and was once used to hunt game, wolves, wild cats, deer, mountain lions, bears, etc. When this type of hunting disappeared from Europe in the late 1800s, Weimaraners became a rarity. However, with selective breeding, they became small hunters and hunting dogs.

Appearance and Attributes

  • Appearance: The Weimaraner is a large, athletic dog breed with a distinctive silver-grey coat. They have long legs, a muscular build, and amber, grey, or blue-grey eyes. Their ears hang down, and their tail is usually docked.
  • Size: Weimaraners stand between 23 and 27 (50 to 68 cm) inches tall at the shoulder and weigh 55 to 90 pounds (25 to 40 kg).
  • Coat & Color: They have a short, smooth, solid grey coat. Puppies are born with white markings that fade as they mature.
  • Temperament: This breed is energetic, loyal, intelligent, and affectionate. Weimaraners need a lot of exercise and mental stimulation. They can be prone to separation anxiety and destructive behaviours if left alone for long periods.
  • Origin and History: The Weimaraner breed originated in Germany in the 19th century, developed by the Weimar court for hunting large game like deer, bear, and wolves. They were known as the “grey ghost” for their unique silvery coat. The breed became popular in America after World War II.
  • Purpose and Uses: Weimaraners are versatile gun dogs and companions. They excel at hunting, field trials, obedience, and agility and make excellent family pets with proper training and socialisation. Their high energy makes them better suited for active owners.

UK price Weimaraner


The average price of a Weimaraner puppy in the UK is £1,200. However, prices can range from £800 to £2,500 depending on the breeder, bloodline, and coat colour.

Here are some factors that can affect the price of a Weimaraner puppy:

  • Breeder: Reputable breeders who have health-tested their dogs and provide a written health guarantee will typically charge more than breeders who do not.
  • Bloodline: Weimaraners from championship bloodlines will typically cost more than pet-quality bloodlines.
  • Coat colour: Silver Weimaraners are typically more expensive than short-haired Weimaraners.

If you are considering buying a Weimaraner puppy, it is essential to research and find a reputable breeder. It would be best if you also asked to see the puppy’s parents and health records.

In Great Britain, the Weimaraner is in demand not only as a hunting dog, but also as a police dog, drug dog, rescue dog or for pet therapy.
Due to its nature as a hunting dog, the Weimaraner is demanding with a great desire to move and a considerable need for activity.

Here are some places where you can find Weimaraner puppies for sale in the UK:

  • The Weimaraner Club of Great Britain: https://weimaranerclubofgreatbritain.org.uk/puppies/
  • Pets4Homes: https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/sale/puppies/weimaraner/sale/
  • UK Pets: https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/sale/puppies/weimaraner/

It is also possible to adopt a Weimaraner from a rescue centre. Many Weimaraners need homes, and adopting a dog is a great way to save a life.

Here are some rescue centres that have Weimaraners for adoption:

Pros and Cons of owning this breed

Here are some of the key pros and cons of owning a Weimaraner:

PROS:

  • Affectionate and loyal: Weimaraners are known for being very caring and loyal companions. They love to be around their people and often follow them from room to room.
  • Intelligent and trainable: Weimaraners are intelligent dogs that are easy to train. They are eager to please their owners and will quickly learn new commands.
  • Playful and energetic: Weimaraners are active and energetic dogs that need plenty of exercise. They love to run, play fetch, and go for walks.
  • Good with children: Weimaraners are generally good with children. They are patient and gentle with kids and can make great playmates.
  • Versatile: Weimaraners are versatile dogs that can be used for various purposes, including hunting, tracking, and agility.
  • Good watchdogs: Weimaraners are alert and protective dogs that make good watchdogs. They will bark to alert their owners of strangers or danger.
  • Good sense of smell: Weimaraners have a good sense of smell, which can be helpful for hunting and tracking.
  • Beautiful dogs: Weimaraners are beautiful dogs with a sleek, athletic build. They come in various colours, including silver, short-haired, and long-haired.
  • Long lifespan: Weimaraners have a long lifespan of 10-13 years.

CONS:

  • High energy: Weimaraners are high-energy dogs that need a lot of exercise. If they are not adequately exercised, they can become destructive or bored.
  • Separation anxiety: Weimaraners are prone to separation anxiety. They do not like to be left alone for long periods and can become destructive or bark excessively if they are left alone.
  • Shedding: Weimaraners shed moderately throughout the year. They may shed more heavily during spring and fall.
  • Sensitive to noise: Weimaraners can be susceptible to noise. They may bark excessively if they hear loud noises.
  • Trainable but can be stubborn: Weimaraners are trainable but can be determined. They require consistent training and positive reinforcement.
  • Strong prey drive: Weimaraners have a strong prey drive. They may chase small animals, such as squirrels and cats.
  • Need early socialisation: Weimaraners need early socialisation to be well-adjusted dogs. They should be exposed to different people, animals, and situations from a young age.
  • Prone to specific health problems: Weimaraners are predisposed to certain health problems, such as hip dysplasia, bloat, and eye problems.

Temperament

Its tame character and ease of learning make it ideal for pet-therapy, community service and water rescue activities.
There is a saying in America:The good news is that Weimaraners are smart; the bad news is that Weimaraners are smart”.

He is knowledgeable, confident in himself and his abilities, and has pronounced instincts. These are three primary characteristics of a Weimaraner. Sweet, but at the same time attentive to everything, decisive and very active are other traits that complete his personality.

Its character is well-balanced and docile, although the dog is very affectionate towards its family members and always ready to defend them from any signs of danger it may perceive. However, he appears wary towards strangers, so it will take time for him to bond with people outside the family circle.

The Weimaraner is also a dog that tends to bark very little, most often when neglected or lonely. Be careful not to underestimate its intelligence; in America, there is a saying: ‘The good news is that Weimaraners are smart; the bad news is that Weimaraners are smart’.

Education and training

The Weimaraner can develop a great understanding and cooperation with its owner. It is a dog engaged in hunting activities and provides appropriate responses when intellectually stimulated, especially in training. The Weimaraner learns everything quickly and increases its interactivity with its owner, who must be active and athletic.

Is it suitable for families and children?

The Weimaraner is a perfect dog for families with children.
Being very sensitive and developing a solid attachment to all family members, he is an excellent playmate and careful supervisor.

This dog has a relatively large size and must be controlled when interacting with small children, what he interprets as gestures of affection can endanger the safety of small children.

There is no question, however, of this dog’s ability to lavish love on children. Providing socialisation right from the dog’s first months to foster this relationship is always valuable. Adult supervision is always indispensable in the child-dog relationship.

Care and health

Although the Weimaraner is very demanding regarding education and exercise, it needs little care. The short-haired Weimaraner, in particular, only needs to be brushed occasionally. To keep the coat shiny, brushing once or twice weekly is sufficient.

The long-haired Weimaraner needs to be brushed a little more often. Especially if it has an undercoat, it should be brushed daily when the coat changes. Apart from this, grooming the rare long-haired Weimaraner is no problem. This breed of dog rarely needs to be washed.

When caring for the Weimaraner, droopy ears must not be neglected. Floppy ears can cause inflammation and infection. Therefore, it is necessary to check and clean the ears regularly. Otherwise, the Weimaraner hardly needs grooming. With regular brushing and good nutrition, it can easily maintain the structure and colour of its coat.

Feeding

As the Weimaraner is one of the most giant dog breeds, it needs a lot of energy as a puppy. At the same time, too much energy can lead to incorrect growth. It may weigh more than usual when grown if it reaches its final weight earlier. If its skeleton is not stable enough, this can lead to problems.

Through play, you can entertain your dog and find lots of fun games on ETSY made entirely by hand for your four-legged friend.

Therefore, the food to be given must be based on the current and expected final weight. The diet must contain many minerals. In particular, calcium, phosphorous, trace elements, and vitamins help it grow.

Feeding your Weiramaner a healthy, species-appropriate diet can reduce the risk of skeletal diseases and gastric torsion.
This breed can unfortunately suffer from gastric torsion; it is important not to exercise the dog immediately after eating and, if possible, to divide the meal into several parts of the day.

A puppy food for large dogs is best suited to help the Weimaraner grow.
The amount of puppy food should be distributed proportionally throughout the day. The Weimaraner tends to swallow food quickly. Small amounts of food prevent the stomach from turning over. Fresh water is also indispensable.

When the Weimaraner is fully grown, it is given adult dog food. Even if he does not hunt, he must still be fed, move, and mentally and physically challenged. Therefore, he needs a diet with lots of carbohydrates. If he does not get much exercise, then reduce the amount of carbohydrates.

He gets his carbohydrates mainly from high-quality meat. Please pay attention to the amount of meat you give him every day. Weimaraners are very greedy and can put on weight quickly. You may have to reduce the amount of food if they gain weight. Good dog food will contain the right mix of protein and fat.

In addition, it is best to feed the adult dog several times a day. In addition, it is best to rest after eating. This also reduces the risk of stomach irritation. The Weimaraner is a robust and healthy dog breed, provided the animal comes from a reliable breeding farm.

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Final Thoughts

Due to its history and rather conspicuous size, the Weimaraner is not a good candidate for a life in cramped quarters or flats without a yard or garden or at least a park nearby. This dog grows considerably and requires a lot of daily exercise that cannot be avoided. The accumulation of stress, combined with the Weimaraner’s size, can be potentially dangerous for any object in the house and, not least, for himself.

Generally, it is not recommended as a first dog, even for a somewhat inexperienced owner. The Weimaraner is a knowledgeable dog that can be responsive and reasonably balanced. Consistent training with a firm pulse is always recommended for a dog that has always been bred for specific tasks, such as the pursuit of even large prey. Limiting incorrect behaviour is indispensable for developing the Weimaraner; the owner must develop an appropriate strategy.

  1. Weimaraner Club of Great Britain
  2. The Weimaraner Association

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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