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The Cane Corso Dog Is All You Need To Know.

The Corso dog is a splendid Italian breed of excellence.

The Corso Dog Breed is all you need to know.

The Cane Corso Dog is a dog with very ancient origins. Its origin is Italian; the Cane Corso Dog is, in fact, a descendant of canis pugnax, the Molossian dog used by Roman legionaries during their war campaigns (the Corso dog was for a very long time identified as ‘Italian Molossian’).

One of the most accredited hypotheses traces the term back to the Latin cohors (guard, protector); another hypothesis is that corso derives from the Greek word kortos (courtyard, enclosure), while others believe it is more plausible to trace the origin of the name back to an ancient Celtic-Provençal adjective, cursus, which can be translated as strong, powerful, robust.

Cane Corso Dog. General description

Corso dog also called: corso dog, corso dogs, giant corso dog, Italian corso dog, corso hound
The dog Corso is undoubtedly a fascinating breed. It is a powerful, large dog made for working on farms and guarding; it is a working dog, not a companion dog. It needs a lot of movement and stimulation.

It has a critical physicality. Therefore, it must be trained seriously and socialised from an extremely young age. He can become aggressive and even dangerous with people and other dogs if poorly trained and socialised. Affectionate towards his family and very attached to his owner, he is not ideal for children, or inexperienced people, who cannot handle him.

Appearance and Attributes of the Cane Corso Dog

Following the breed standard criteria, the Corso dog is a medium/large dog, which can weigh up to 50 kilos and be as tall as 68 centimetres at withers. Among the main characteristics to be noted is the solid and muscular neck.

In addition, the trunk is square, and the conformation of the head is brachycephalic, i.e. short and wide, with a square muzzle. The colours of the Corso are: black, lead grey, slate grey, light fawn; red deer, dark fawn, and dark wheat colour (wheat).

Physical characteristics permitted by the standard:

  • Height: 60 to 68 cm
  • Weight: 40 to 50 kg
  • Longevity: 10 to 14 years
  • Colours: Red, fawn, grey, black, light, harlequin, silver, golden
  • Fur: Dense, short
  • Coat: Masked, uniform, tigerish
The Corso Dog Breed is all you need to know.
The Corso dog is a medium-large, muscular dog.

Price and maintenance Cane Corso Dog

The price of a Cane Corso puppy is in the middle range (between £700 and £2,500, with the average price sitting around £1,500). However, remember not to go cheap when buying a specimen of such a powerful breed, or you may end up with a puppy with hereditary character defects.

Only turn to serious breeders who test their breeding stock for hereditary defects and character traits, which are essential in this breed. Apart from the initial price, the dog Corso does not have high maintenance costs and does not require professional grooming. However, participation in training and education courses may be necessary.

Pros and cons of the Cane Corso Dog

Top 5 characteristics:

  • Energy level
  • Tendency to hunt prey
  • Tolerance to hot temperatures
  • Affection towards the family
  • Salivation and drooling

The five most problematic characteristics:

  • Suitable as a first dog
  • Relationship with strangers
  • Sociality with other dogs
  • Adaptability to flat life
  • Need for exercise

Cane Corso Dog. Character and sociability

Character and temperament

“Rather a sensitive dog that wants a firm but affectionate owner.”
Like many other dogs with a similar temperament, the Cane Corso is also rather sensitive. It needs an owner who can be a solid and consistent leader, affectionate but at the same time firm, whom it can trust and with whom it can relax. He does not react positively to shouting and aggression (and physical punishment is forbidden) but is very sensitive to the tone of voice and gestures. This must be kept in mind during training and daily life. However, it is a reliable dog if well-trained and brought up.

Affectionate towards the family

“Dog that lives for his family.”
The Cane Corso lives for its family, and although it does not have the irresistible sweetness of other breeds, it explicitly shows its affection. He loves caresses and being with his loved ones, whom he is willing to protect at any cost. But, unfortunately, this dog’s affection for his family tends to be too exclusive, to the point that, if not properly socialised, he may try to drive away every stranger and every other dog.

Friendly with children

“Does not naturally adapt to the company of children.”
The Corso always wants to control the situation and constantly puts itself in the driving seat. For this reason, he does not naturally adapt to the company of children unless he has been used to dealing with man cubs from an early age. His size also prevents him from being a safe dog with children as, even with just a paw or a tail, he could cause harm. It is, however, a breed suitable for pet therapy.

Relationship with strangers

“Distrustful by nature towards strangers.”
A tireless guardian and always alert, the Cane Corso is naturally wary of strangers. How significant this mistrust is and how aggressively the dog reacts to people it does not know depends on how it is socialised as a puppy. A dog not used to dealing with many different people will bark furiously at every stranger approaching its territory and, in extreme cases, even attack.

Sociality with other dogs

“Wary of other dogs, may become aggressive.”
Like human strangers, the Cane Corso is also wary of other dogs. With its sometimes arrogant character, this large dog almost always wants to be the boss, mainly if the owner cannot impose himself as pack leader. A poorly socialised Cane Corso can be dangerous to other dogs and try to attack them.

Must read:

The adaptability of the Cane Corso Dog

Adaptability to flat life

“Dog not at all suitable for flat life.”
The Cane Corso is a working breed, selected as a fighting dog, hunting dog, guard dog and aid on livestock farms. In short, it is a versatile and powerful dog, but not suitable for a balanced life. This breed requires space and movement and cannot live well within four walls.

Tolerance of being alone

“Can tolerate brief moments of loneliness.”
The Cane Corso always requires the presence of its owner because it suffers greatly from loneliness. There will be moments when it must be alone, but these must be sporadic, as the Corso suffers immeasurably if prolonged. The company of another dog, even of the same breed and opposite sex, may mitigate the lack of an owner.

Suitable as a first dog

“Not suitable for inexperienced owners.”
You cannot adopt a Cane Corso unless you intend to provide it with severe and constant training. This large dog with a significant character can become aggressive and even dangerous. It is unsuitable for inexperienced owners who cannot properly handle a dog of this strength and temperament.

Tolerance to cold temperatures

“In the cold months, providing a warm shelter is necessary.”
The Cane Corso’s coat is short, thick and shiny, with an undercoat. It allows it to live all year round outdoors without any problems, but a warm shelter must be available in cold months with harsh weather. In addition, it has short undercoats to stay outdoors, which is not recommended for almost all dogs.

Tolerance to hot temperatures

“He has good heat tolerance.”
Despite its large size and belonging to the molluscoid family, the Cane Corso has good heat tolerance. Therefore, summer does not cause him any particular problems. However, it needs shade, coolness and sufficient water.

The Corso Dog Breed is all you need to know.
The Cane Corso always requires the presence of its owner.

Care and Health of the Cane Corso Dog

Care and hair loss

“It loses its hair twice a year.”
The Corso has a short but dense coat with an undercoat that sheds twice a year. If the dog lives outdoors, the hair will not be a big problem, and one brush a week is enough to keep it under control. If he lives indoors, on the other hand, brushing will be more frequent to prevent shedding on carpets and sofas.

Salivation and drool containment

“He may drool in certain situations.”
This dog may drool wildly when barking and agitated. In general, it is not the best if you are looking for a dog to keep indoors, both for cleaning and, above all, for character reasons and this powerful breed’s movement and work requirements.

Ease of cleaning

“A good diet will help the glands to secrete odour.”
Caring for the Cane Corso’s coat does not require much attention. A few baths and brushing are sufficient to keep it at its best. However, special attention must be paid to the diet as the Corso has sebaceous glands that, depending on the diet, cause the dog to have a particular odour that, as mentioned, is unrelated to hygiene.

Health and Diseases

“It generally enjoys good health.”
Despite its size, the average lifespan of this dog is similar to that of many medium-sized breeds, around 14 years. It is a breed that generally enjoys good health, apart from the classic problems of giant dogs: hip dysplasia and stomach torsion. Excessive prognathism is a defect that can plague the breed. Like practically all Molossians, it can suffer from eyelid problems.

Tendency to put on weight

“It can easily put on weight if it does not move around enough.”
This working dog must move a lot and be busy to maintain overall mental and physical shape. If he leads too sedentary a life, he can quickly gain weight. The amount of food must be proportionate to his lifestyle, as well as his size and age. Feeding him twice a day is also recommended to avoid the risk of stomach twisting.

Learning about the Cane Corso Dog

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Intelligence and training

“Able to learn a great deal.”
The education and training of the Cane Corso involve time and passion. As a breed used for guarding and defence, careful socialisation should be fostered to distinguish between different contexts and act sensibly. The Corso is intelligent and can learn a lot of commands. However, he needs to be trained; otherwise, his character may become dominant and aggressive. Training must be conducted without violence but firmly and consistently, without backing down when faced with ‘leadership tests’.

The Cane Corso Dog is all you need to know.
Muscular owner training his Cane Corso dog outdoors.

Loyalty and running away

“He may chase passers-by, dogs or cats.”
Keeping your Corso outdoors ensures the fence surrounding your house is strong enough. Hardly will this guard dog stray very far, but he might be tempted to chase a passer-by, another dog or a cat. Beware also of his extraordinary digging abilities.

Tendency to bite

“If well trained, he will not bite unless in danger.”
A well-trained Cane Corso with a good temperament will not bite unless there is a real danger. However, it is possible to encounter specimens with an overly aggressive or distrustful character that are not corrected by adequate training. These specimens can attack and bite and, unfortunately, can be dangerous. Therefore, it is a Molossian not suitable for dog sports as it is, first and foremost, a guardian and defender.

Tendency to hunt prey

“He should never be left off-leash outside his territory.”
A Cane Corso should never be left off the leash, neither in the city nor in the countryside or woods, where this powerful dog, once used for hunting, could rekindle its predatory instincts.

Tendency to bark or howl

“It barks out of a protective instinct towards the family.”
This dog does not have a great tendency to howl or bark to express itself but does so when protecting its home and family from what it considers to be dangers. He is a natural defender who may misinterpret visitors’ intentions, so you should immediately ascertain why he barks.

The Cane Corso Dog Needs Exercise

Energy level

“Dog with abundant energy.”
A dog born for work, the Corso has the energy to spare and the physical strength of a real fighter. It needs to have a task to devote itself to; otherwise, it will find one (usually to guard the house, defending it from any strangers who come nearby). Therefore, it should not be relegated to the four walls and must be exercised a lot.

Vigour

“Vigour is the essence of the Cane Corso”.
The Corso is a rustic and vigorous dog, brave. It is highly affectionate and is considered the best dog for family and territory defence. In addition, it is an excellent helper in Civil Defence engagements.

Need for exercise

“Needs a lot of exercise and movement.”
It should be clear to you by now: the Corso is a demanding dog, requiring a lot of time and constancy. In particular, it needs a lot of exercises and is therefore unsuitable for those looking for a quiet companion dog. It has to run, work, and be busy, or it can become nervous and engage in destructive activities, such as constantly barking or digging holes in the garden.

Tendency to play

“Not very fond of play.”
Despite its great need for movement, the Cane Corso remains rather severe in its activities. It is not very fond of play, to which it prefers work. He will hardly be distracted by a ball if he is keeping watch and thinks he has to protect his family. It is a tireless worker, a confirmed workaholic, who will not give much satisfaction to those looking for a playful dog.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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