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Navigating Dog Training: Choosing Trustworthy Courses and Trainers

Discover the challenges in finding trustworthy dog trainers and behaviorists. Learn about efforts to unite professionals for better standards.

Planning a chartered training course for dog in 2022

Navigating Dog Training. The canine world can be bewildering for any dog owner trying to find a training course for dogs or a good trainer or behaviourist to help them with their dog.

During dog training, you will always hear different opinions.

No matter who you ask, you will get a different answer; virtually every professional says they are qualified and a member of one of the many organisations that litter any internet search.

Sorting out who can be relied upon and trusted with your beloved dog can be a total minefield. Other professionals, such as veterinarians and dog guardians, often do not know who to recommend because of the many differences between the groups and qualified individuals to train your dog.

The main reason is that there is no industry regulation, which is probably surprising to many.

Times are changing in the dog world, and moves to unite the training and behavioural professions under one banner could be great news for dog owners; as trainer and behaviourist.

Carolyn Menteith

Whether or not they are trained, qualified, accredited, or experienced dog trainers, anyone can say they are a dog trainer or a canine behaviourist.

Unlike any other professional in an educational or behavioural field, there is no governing body to ensure that they have a code of practice and ethics or any oversight and accountability to the advice and services.

In context, it is like a schoolteacher, a psychologist, a nursery, or a doctor working with your child, despite not being qualified.

But above all, without being bound by the strict rules governing their professional conduct.

Training course for dogs. There have been more attempts to address this within the dog industry.

There have been attempts to address this issue within the industry. Still, they have failed to unite most professionals or provide greater clarity to dog owners and guardians.

Much of this probably comes from the attitudes of the various training and behaviour groups. For example, there is a well-known saying in the dog world that if you put three dog trainers in one room, the only thing two of them will ever agree on is that the third is doing it wrong!

It raises a wry smile from everyone working in Training and behaviour, mainly because it’s accurate!

There are endless dog training courses and behaviour groups, often with names just a bewildering set of letters claiming to be the best. They each attract a different type of trainer or behaviourist depending on their focus, personality, and methodology.

Generally, albeit with notable exceptions, they avoid each other whenever possible but, when forced to mix at conferences and events, tend to congregate in their different tribes, staring daggers at each other and looking a little like the Sharks and the Jets from ‘West Side Story.

OK, perhaps I exaggerate a little, but for a group focused on interspecies harmony, socialisation, communication, and playing nicely together, we historically haven’t been the friendliest towards those who share our profession.

There are reasons for this: perceived competition, lack of professional recognition in a fast-growing industry, and imposter syndrome.

Our instructors are all very passionate about what we do and want to help the dogs and their owners in the best possible way.

Sorting out who can be trusted with your beloved dog can be a total minefield.

Planning a chartered training course for dogs.
Understanding and balance between man and dog.

We very often hold lives in our hands. Over the years, we have all seen bad trainers, dreadful advice, dubious methodology, cruelty dressed up as behaviour modification, and lack of professional ethics or accountability, and have had to pick up the pieces were (and sometimes heartbreakingly if) possible.

Along with the absence of any governing body, all this has led to a historical suspicion that others we fear may not live up to our professional standards. So many (symbolic) weeing up the furniture goes on when we get together.

Something had to change. As most great movements do, it started modestly, with a secret meeting in a dubious Travelodge at the side of a busy motorway.

Where representatives of several Training and behaviour organisations slid surreptitiously into a booth at the bar, trying hard not to be noticed and failing miserably!

The plan was to do something that had never successfully been done before uniting the profession under an inclusive, cooperative umbrella banner.

It enables organisations that favour modern methodology, solid accreditation, professional ethics and accountability to continue working autonomously within a framework that owners and other professionals can recognise and trust.

This was an ambitious dream, and as we sat in the corner of the bar, hopeful and enthusiastic, we were still partially resigned to another failed attempt. Still, it became clear that we were all in complete agreement as discussions continued.

The only way for the industry to move forward for the good of dogs, owners, and professionals was to unite and do it together.

Training course for dogs. The Charter is not yet another new organisation.

After two years of intense meetings and discussions, other organisations have joined the group. A common cause united all; the vision, determination, and spirit of collaboration had primarily been missing, but with a passion for improving the profession for the good of dogs and owners.

The Charter is not yet another new organisation but a simple statement of intent that existing organisations can sign up for and support.

It sets out a declaration regarding welfare, methodologies, and professional conduct, and fully accredited members of those signatory organisations can use the Charter symbol to give security and clarity to owners and professionals alike.

In addition, it will seek to provide a platform for continuous communication within the sector and representation vis-à-vis the government.

Uniquely, while the individual organisations will remain responsible for the accreditation of their members and will continue to work autonomously, there is a Charter oversight committee, which will oversee any appeals or grievances to provide full accountability and added security.

The oversight committee is comprised of independent professionals of good standing and renown outside the training and behaviour industry and independent of Charter organisations. It includes legal, veterinary, ethics, and education experts.

A strong start has been made. All the Charter members are committed to working together to maintain and improve professional standards to give owners a choice they can trust.

Here is a selected list of trainers to choose from:

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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