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Life With A Senior Dog

Caring for an elderly dog is an extraordinary commitment that can only partly repay the affection and dedication that our animal has dedicated to us during its (unfortunately) concise life.

Life With A Senior Dog

Life with a senior dog. Even if we don’t want to, our beloved dogs also grow old, and it is inevitable for us owners to share this last phase with them, which, as with humans, certainly needs more attention and care.

At what age does the dog become old?

A dog always needs specific care suitable and compatible with every age group. Still, when it becomes elderly, it is even more important to change its habits and behaviour to accommodate its new needs.

These might concern food, frequency of visits to the vet, exercise and playtime, and sleeping hours. In addition, of course, every animal has specific needs, depending on breed, size, personal predisposition and individual characteristics.

In principle:

  • A small dog (0 to 9kg) starts to be considered senior from 11.
  • A medium-sized one (10 to 22kg) from age 10.
  • A large dog (23 to 40 kg) from age 8.
  • While giant dogs (over 40kg) from the age of 7.

There are also dogs that, being healthy, active and agile, show the signs of time later. But on the other hand, others who may be ill or not very active may show particular age-related needs even before the general indications.

In any case, entering this phase is highly individual and should always be approached with awareness, respect and love for one’s dog.

Nutrition and check-ups

Concerning diet, it is best to follow the advice of your veterinary surgeon, who will undoubtedly be able to recommend the most appropriate and healthy food for your pet.

However, as a general rule, because the calorie requirements of older dogs are 10%-20% lower than those of younger dogs, it is possible to adapt the quantities of meals to avoid unnecessary weight gain in the dog.

A few illnesses, tiredness or simply age make our pet less patient, and his ability to adapt also decreases. For example, being surrounded by noisy children will not be easy for him. We, therefore, teach children to respect them at this stage too.

The best choice is to feed low-fat but highly palatable food, as the sense of smell and taste diminish in older animals.

A correct diet also ensures that the dog is not overweight, which could worsen common diseases in senior dogs, such as osteoarthritis or joint problems.

In addition to the diet and any additions of specific nutrients (such as Omega-3), which should always be determined with your veterinary doctor, regular check-ups are also important, as they are essential for the early identification of senile diseases and for planning the treatment. Therefore, a check-up every 6-12 months is strongly recommended, as it can save or prolong his Life in many cases.

New Habits in the Life of a senior dog

New Habits in the Life of a senior dog.
Caring for someone makes us feel more important and find a psychological balance.

In addition, as a dog gets older, behavioural changes may occur, such as incontinence, changes in sleeping habits, less interaction with owners and a decrease in physical activity. All this must be respected and indulged in; the dog must do what it feels like, according to its abilities and energy.

However, his interest must be kept alive to keep his mind fresh and active, with games and activities adapted to his new needs.

In fact, as with people, our four-legged friend needs external stimuli to remain active and dynamic.

Cases of ‘senile dementia‘ can also occur in our pets (this also justifies strange behaviour that we may notice in our dog, such as staring at the wall), and mental activity, as well as physical activity, is essential to combat it.

No stress

It is also essential to avoid sudden changes and stressful situations, which may be difficult for an elderly dog to cope with.

Illness, tiredness or simply age make our dogs less patient, and their ability to adapt decreases.

For example, it will not be easy for him to be surrounded by children running and screaming or even by other dogs, perhaps puppies, who want to play, run and jump.

A dog always needs specific care suitable and compatible with every age group. Still, it is even more important to change its habits and behaviour to accommodate its new needs when it becomes older.

Instead, he will need quiet, low-noise places where he will decide when and how to play.

Let us not forget that there is often reduced visual and hearing acuity. These problems may contribute to our elderly dogs feeling particularly fragile and insecure concerning the outside world.

Our job is to make them feel safe and secure in every situation.

Life with a senior dog needs more love.

Although a senior dog necessarily brings with it the need to put a few tricks into practice, let us not underestimate the power of love that it can still give us.

Their affection and closeness become even more precious and unique: we become their support and only point of reference, and their gaze will never cease to remind us of this.

Being with our pet’s senior is an enriching, sensitising experience, which, although it brings sadness and fear, can fill our hearts and minds with beautiful, unforgettable memories.

Three orthopaedic beds for your old dog’s well-being chosen by us:

Dog Bed, Sustainable, Orthopaedic Memory Foam ideal for senior Dog.
These sustainable dog beds are designed and distributed in the UK and meet the highest quality and safety standards.
Luxurious Sleeping Experience with Our Pet.
An orthopaedic memory foam dog bed is a must-have for senior dog owners.
Luxury Dog Bed, Sustainable, Washable, Orthopaedic
This sustainable dog beds meet the highest quality and safety standards.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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