in

Dog Recall Training Tips: Expert Advice for Effective Recall Training

Make sure your dog knows that coming to you is a good thing. Always reward them with praise and a treat when they come to you.

How to recall your dog

How to Improve Dog Recall. Here are six tips from renowned dog trainer Ben Randall that solve your canine dilemmas.

Training a dog to turn back is a real headache for millions of owners, but why is recall such a problem? Why is it so familiar with all breeds worldwide?

The main reason is that, since they are puppies, most dogs have been given too much freedom on walks and have become too independent, by which I mean that they quickly find their entertainment, which is much more exciting than anything their owner has to offer.

Moreover, when they return, they are often greeted sternly and put back on the leash, which is why the dog is not enthusiastic about returning when called.

Ben Randall decided to share six valuable tips on how to call your dog back after receiving the following message from a user:

Dear Ben,’ writes PL from Dorset. ‘I have a young Labrador, who is well-mannered and obedient around the house, but doesn’t always come back when he’s called, particularly when I take him to the park and he’s distracted by other dogs and people. What can I do to ensure he comes back to me every time?

Turns recall training of the dog into a game

Create games you can play with your dog at home, such as hiding balls or food in the house and asking them to find them. Start in a controlled environment, such as the kitchen or hallway, and create more open spaces. Making it fun for them is crucial. Think about it: if you were a dog and your owner or lover yelled at you, “Come back, Jack, you naughty boy!” You might not even want to do as you told you.

Recall your dog. Take it outside once you have learned to remember inside

Going out can have associations for your dog that hinder recall training. If you let your young dog into the garden to go to the toilet ten times a day, and he goes wild every time, that’s potentially 300 times a month that you have allowed him to find his outdoor recreation and not listen to you.

Once your dog is used to playing lure games in the house, move the hide-and-seek games to the garden: after your dog has done his business, the game can begin. Again, using your dog’s instinct and desire to find things will help encourage them to focus on you and see you as exciting and someone they want to return to quickly.

Make it more difficult gradually and, if necessary, return to the basics.

Remember, the key here is to build up this exercise by doing it in more different and more tempting environments. If you make it increasingly difficult, you should be able to improve your dog’s memory. However, if you encounter problems, go back to basics and focus on a more accessible game that your dog can quickly get before trying again in a place with more distractions.

Build dog recall training into your walks.

How to recall your dog

You can then use these toys while you walk your dog, so hide balls, puppets or food for him to search for everywhere. Anyone can do this with any dog, regardless of breed – it does not have to be a chore but a game – as all dogs love to eat or sniff.

But don’t rush to this point: trying to bribe your dog with a treat is less likely to work when you are out and about because smells – such as the smell of game or squirrels, other dogs, livestock and people – are much more tempting than a piece of cheese.

Recall your dog. Mealtime can be a great time to work on memory

Meal times are also an excellent opportunity to teach all kinds of commands, but they are instrumental in remembering well, as we can encourage the dog to learn its name and respond to whistle commands.

Blow a whistle (three or four times individually) when you prepare food for your dog. Then, ask him to follow you around the garden while you take the food to the bowl and say your dog’s name or whistle, like the Pied Piper.

Use rewards sparingly: build bonding and trust.

You can also create a better memory by giving your dog a reward or food praise every time he returns when called. However, don’t reward him every time: it is essential that the dog remembers repeatedly and knows that he has to work hard as a team with you to build that trust in the knowledge that he will only be rewarded for consistent good behaviour.

More detailed advice on training methods

Ben Randall is an award-winning dog trainer – For more detailed advice on Ben Randall’s positive, reward-based and proven BG training methods, one-to-one training sessions, residential training or five-star dog boarding at his BGHQ in Herefordshire, call 01531 670960 or visit www.ledburylodgekennels.co.uk

A seven-day free trial of the Gundog app costs £24.99 per month or £249.99 per year.

Final Thoughts about to recall a Dog

  1. Choose a cue word and stick to it. The cue word could be “come,” “here,” or anything else that you want to use. Choosing a short and easy term for your dog to understand is essential.
  2. Start training in a quiet environment. Once your dog knows the cue word, you can train them to come to you in a calm environment. Start by standing a few feet from your dog and calling them to you. When they come to you, please give them a treat and praise them.
  3. Gradually add distractions. You can add distractions once your dog reliably comes to you in a quiet environment. Start by training in a less serene environment, such as your backyard. Then, you can start training in more distracting environments, such as the park or the beach.
  4. Be patient and consistent. Recall training takes time and patience. It’s essential to be compatible with your training and consistently reward your dog when they come to you.

Here are some additional tips:

  • Use a happy, excited voice when you call your dog.
  • Make sure your dog knows that coming to you is a good thing. Always reward them with praise and a treat when they come to you.
  • Don’t chase your dog. If your dog starts to run away, stop calling them, turn around, and walk away. This will make your dog more likely to come to you the next time you call them.
  • If your dog has trouble coming to you, try using a long line. This will give you more control over your dog and make it easier for them to approach you.

You can train your dog to have a reliable recall with patience and consistency. This is an important safety skill for all dogs, and it can help to prevent your dog from getting into dangerous situations.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

Affiliate Disclosure: The Frenchie Breed website may receive a small commission from the proceeds of any product(s) sold through affiliate and direct partner links at no cost to you.

Follow Frenchie Breed on Google News

+ posts

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

Leave a Reply

What do you think?

201 Points
Upvote Downvote

Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

Tiger Optical Illusion: Spot the Hidden Tiger Among Zebras in 10 Seconds

Can You Spot the Tiger in This Herd of Zebras? Tiger Optical Illusion Challenge!

A German Sherpherd named Hero is making headlines for his heartwarming act of pushing his disabled owner's wheelchair.

A Dog Pushes Its Disabled Owner’s Wheelchairs.