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Help My Dog Cope with Fireworks – Tips from Our Vet for Scared Dogs

How can I help my dog during the fireworks?

Help my dog fireworks. We asked our vet, Dr Dimitris, for his advice. With the fireworks just a few weeks away, many pet owners are now wondering how to deal with the anxiety that fireworks cause their furry friends.

Our veterinarian, Dr Dimitris Tachos, shared his top tips on calming pets and reducing their stress levels. Up to three-quarters of pets are estimated to suffer anxiety due to loud fireworks at this time of year.

Expert doctor Dr Dimitris Tachos said: “Bonfire night and New Year’s Eve or other festivities are stressful for many cats, dogs and other pets, often aggravated by their acute hearing, which can make fireworks seem overwhelming.”

Do not underestimate how scary fireworks can be for your dog

How can I help my dog during the fireworks?
Two scared or afraid puppy dogs wrapped with a curtain.

We also see a lot of self-harm at this time of year, often due to panicked animals running to escape the noise or chewing on things they shouldn’t relieve stress. You cannot underestimate how scary fireworks can be for pets.

However, there are things pet owners can do to address anxious behaviour, as well as help prepare pets for the fireworks season.

There are also treatments and medications available to help pets stay calm. However, anyone worried about their pets should prepare and talk to their vet about severe cases.

Help my dog during the fireworks. Here is a list of tips for pet owners ahead of Bonfire Night:

  • Walk your dogs before dark, or skip evening walks on Bonfire Night and surrounding days. In addition, you can provide many activities at home for a few days to keep your dogs entertained.
  • Most pets will have an area of the house where they prefer to hide; making a den here will mean your pet is more likely to use it. Ensure the shelter you choose is safe for your pet; for example, the cupboard under the stairs is safer than the back of the TV!
  • Make sure that wherever your pet is hiding, it is always accessible, whether you are at home or not. If you are unexpectedly unable to return home and your pet cannot reach its lair, this may cause further upset.

How we react to our pets’ anxieties and fears of noise is very important. Lots of kissing and cuddling may seem like the perfect way to reassure our dogs, but this may cause their anxiety levels to rise. When they seek reassurance from other dogs, cuddle, and lick to gather information, they may see our kisses while we need relief, and this may suggest that there is something to worry about, so it is best to avoid it.

  • Stay calm. Be available for your animal if it seeks you, but do not crowd it. Instead, give the animal space and a reward for settling in its den. Ignore any unwanted behaviour, and do not react.
  • In the den, chews, treats, toys and LickiMats help calm and settle animals.
  • Listening to music or turning on the TV can help block out the noise of fireworks, and many pets respond positively to soothing music.

Help my dog during the fireworks, and you can also ask your veterinary clinic for advice.

If you are making a bonfire at home, remember to move the wood before lighting it to disturb any wild animals, such as hedgehogs, that may have crept in and may escape.

Your local veterinary clinic should be able to advise on preventing noise phobias and noise desensitisation programmes suitable for your pet to help him during the fireworks.

Sounds Scary, Sounds Sociable and Sounds Soothing are free downloads on the Dogs Trust website, along with a guide on how to use them.

Ask any pet owner for advice on how they have resolved their pet’s inherent fear or anxiety about noises/fireworks.

Start desensitising puppies and kittens now, but if you already know that your pets are likely to be very afraid, you may need expert guidance or medication, so consult your vet.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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