in

Gordon Setter Dog Breed: A Unique and Loving Companion for Active Families

The Gordon Setter is a beautiful, loving dog that makes a great family pet. They are active and playful but also gentle and affectionate. They are relatively easy to train, but early socialization and training are essential. If you are looking for a loyal and loving companion, the Gordon Setter is a great choice.

The Gordon Setter is a large, athletic dog with a long, silky black coat with tan markings.

Gordon setter dog breed. It seems that the progenitors of the Setter Gordon were fiery black spaniel-type dogs known in Scotland since the 17th century. Later, the breed was crossed with the setter type (both English and Irish) and the pointer and Collie.

According to some historians, there were also bloodhounds among the Gordon setter’s ancestors. In the 19th century, Gordon setters were exported to the United States, Canada and Australia, where they became trendy.

Origin

The Setter Gordon breed was created towards the end of the 18th century by the Scottish Duke Alexander IV of Gordon. It is said to have originated from a cross between an English Setter and a Collie.

According to various authors, the Irish Setter and the Bloodhound, known as the Chien de Saint Ubert, also formed the breed. Gordon setter is a fitting acknowledgement in honour of the breeder who improved the breed and established its technical characteristics and excellent hunting qualities.
Duke Alexander IV of Gordon Castle was not the creator but the first and most outstanding breeder and improver of the officially recognised black-furred setters, later Gordons.

According to the cynologist Vetrier, as early as 1526, shepherd dogs were being used to mate with hounds. The origin of the Gordon setter seems to be precisely due to a mating of a shepherd bitch with Duke Alexander IV’s best Gordon setter.

In the region of Scotland north of Fochabers, near the Duke’s properties, before the 19th century, many shepherds owned herding dogs, which had hunting qualities even superior to the English hunting breeds of the time. When the Duke hunted on his estates at Gordon Castle, he borrowed a shepherd female, who was very good at hunting. She was his favourite and later became mated with a good male owned by the Duke, the progenitor of the breed.

Legend has it that this shepherd bitch was a Collie breed. She may have been a shepherd, but she was not a Collie because this breed has completely different ethnic traits to the Gordon.
The Gordon’s trunk is in the square, the Collie’s trunk is longer than it is tall, and it has a framework bone structure, unlike the Gordon, which has a large bone structure.

In addition, the Gordon has ears that are pendulous and long and set low, whereas the Collie has them small and erect (only the upper third bent forward and down). Perhaps there is Blodhound and Labrador blood in the probable contributors to the genesis of the Gordon.

From this shepherd breed bitch covered by a Gordon were born six puppies with a black coat with white and brown spots. This was the first litter of the Gordon Castle breeding. The first Gordons bred by the Duke were tricolour, or black with white spots and dots.

The Duke preferred this coat with white spots because it enabled him to distinguish them better from a distance. As early as 1620, a breed of setter-type stationary dogs with a black flamed coat was known in Scotland; Charles II owned several of them in 1660 and preferred them to other inactive dogs. Laverlack, a regular visitor to the Duke’s kennels, wrote in 1828.

In 1725, there were two varieties of Setters Gordon

For a long time and now, the Setters at the Duke’s Castle are all black, white and fire‘.
In 1725, there were two varieties of Gordon Setters: black, white and red-brown and black and light brown.

The black-white and red-brown one was tall, with strong bones, long ears and much fur and fringing, while the other was of lighter build and less abundant fur. The Gordon kennel did not breed dogs with weak bones, long muzzles, little lips, or watery eyes. The kennel manager was Mr Jubb, who was also a good dresser.

In the 1800s, the breed became popular; it was the breed of choice. The coat gradually changed from black, white and fiery to fiery black with a single white patch on the chest and the presence of mahogany-red tawny spots, and the size was made lighter and faster by the introduction of Irish blood.

“Brains, beauty, and bird sense” is a phrase often applied to the Gordon Setter.
Gordon Setters are known for their gentle and loving nature. They are good with children and other pets and make great family dogs.

Mr Idstone, pseudonym of the Evangelical Pastor T. Pearce, breeder and skilful dresser, in the year 1865, insisted on advising to lighten them with skilful crosses (see English but mainly Irish setters). Many listened to him and put his suggestions into practice, among them Mr. Robert Chappan Glemboig, who obtained, after several years, the desired dogs, namely lighter, faster and with more blood (passion).

The Gordon setter of the Chapman kennels that brought back the most prizes was Champion Heather Grouse, recognised as the best Setter of that era. Many requests were received by Champion breeding from abroad and especially from Norway, where this breed became widespread and for several years was produced with excellent results.

Paul Caillard also imported some into France, as well as into Germany, Sweden and even Russia. Gordons also arrived in Italy from Norway, and at the end of the 19th and early 20th century, they were considered the best hunting setters.

It is worth mentioning the happy and numerous imports from Norway made by Count Emanuele Morteo (Canile of la Torre), who imported, among others, the stallion Range Steck, of mighty construction, a beautiful head and very good at hunting. Prof. Gino Pollaci should also be mentioned among the breeders of those years.

The most appreciated Gordon setter of the 1930s, born and bred in Italy for its genuinely outstanding hunting qualities, was Prince di S. Anna del Comm.

Appearance and Attributes

  • Appearance:
    • Large, muscular dog with a long, silky coat.
    • Black coat with tan markings on the muzzle, cheeks, chest, legs, and underside.
    • Brown eyes and long, drooping ears.
    • The tail is long and feathery.
  • Height:
    • Male: 25-27 inches (63.5-69 cm)
    • Female: 23-26 inches (58.5-66 cm)
  • Weight:
    • Male: 65-80 pounds (29-36 kg)
    • Female: 55-70 pounds (25-32 kg)
  • Lifespan: 10-12 years
  • Attributes:
    • Gentle, affectionate, and loyal.
    • Good with children and other pets.
    • Active and playful.
    • Needs regular exercise.
    • Easy to train but can be stubborn at times.
    • Prone to some health problems, such as hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and eye problems.

UK Price of Gordon Setter

The price of a Gordon Setter puppy in the UK can range from £600 to £900. The cost will vary depending on the breeder, the pedigree of the puppy, and the location. Puppies from reputable breeders will typically be more expensive than puppies from less reputable breeders.

Here are some of the factors that can affect the price of a Gordon Setter puppy:

  • The breeder: Reputable breeders typically charge more for their puppies than less reputable ones. This is because they invest more time and money into breeding healthy and well-socialised puppies.
  • The pedigree: Puppies with a good pedigree will typically be more expensive than puppies without a pedigree. This is because pedigrees can help to ensure that the puppy is of good quality and has a low risk of health problems.
  • The location: The price of a Gordon Setter puppy can also vary depending on the spot. Puppies in more popular areas, such as London, will typically be more expensive than puppies in less popular sites.

If you are considering getting a Gordon Setter puppy, it is essential to do your research and find a reputable breeder. It would be best if you also were prepared to pay a premium for a puppy from a good breeder.

Here are some additional costs to consider when owning a Gordon Setter:

  • Food: A Gordon Setter will need high-quality food designed for large dogs. This can cost around £50-£60 per month.
  • Vet care: Regular vet care, such as vaccinations and check-ups, can cost around £200 per year.
  • Grooming: Gordon Setters has a long, thick coat that requires regular grooming. This can cost around £50-£60 per month.
  • Toys and other expenses: You will also need to factor in the cost of toys, beds, and other accessories for your Gordon Setter. This can cost around £100 per year.

Overall, the cost of owning a Gordon Setter can be significant. However, they can be wonderful companions if you are willing to invest time and money.

Pros and Cons of Owning this Breed

The Gordon Setter is a beautiful dog that makes a great family pet. However, they are not the right choice for everyone. If you are looking for a low-maintenance dog, the Gordon Setter is not for you. But if you are willing to put in the time and effort, they can be a loyal and loving companion for many years.

Pros:

  • Gentle, affectionate, and loyal.
  • Good with children and other pets.
  • Active and playful.
  • Needs regular exercise.
  • Easy to train but can be stubborn at times.
  • Beautiful and elegant appearance.
  • They are not as common as other dog breeds so they can be unique and special.

Cons:

  • Requires a lot of exercise.
  • Prone to shedding.
  • It is not hypoallergenic, so it may not be the best choice for people with allergies.
  • They can be stubborn at times.
  • Some health problems include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and eye problems.
  • Owning can be expensive due to food, vet care, grooming, and toys.

The Gordon Setter is a beautiful dog breed with many positive qualities. However, one must be aware of the potential downsides before getting one. If you are willing to put in the time and effort, the Gordon Setter can be a loyal and loving companion for many years.

Here are some additional things to consider before getting a Gordon Setter:

  • Do you have enough time to exercise and play with a large dog?
  • Are you prepared to deal with shedding?
  • Are you willing to take your dog to the vet for regular check-ups and vaccinations?
  • Can you afford the cost of owning a Gordon Setter?

If you answered yes to all of these questions, then the Gordon Setter may be the right dog for you. However, it is best to talk to a reputable breeder or veterinarian if unsure. They can help you to decide if a Gordon Setter is the right fit for your lifestyle.

Books that you should read:

Temperament

The Gordon Setter is an energetic, affectionate, and loyal hunting dog that makes an excellent family companion when properly trained and exercised. This breed is very active and needs plenty of daily exercise and activities to keep them mentally and physically stimulated.

Gordon Setters are intelligent and responsive dogs that aim to please their owners. They are eager to learn and generally pick up on training reasonably quickly. However, their high energy level makes them rambunctious and boisterous when young. Early socialisation and obedience training are essential for this breed.

The Gordon Setter is alert and curious, which makes it an excellent hunting dog. They have a strong prey drive and love tracking and pursuing birds. Their energetic nature shines through in their playfulness and exuberance when not hunting. They love activities like hiking, running, and playing fetch.

This breed tends to be friendly and outgoing. They get along well with children, other dogs, and strangers they meet. Gordon Setters thrive when around people and are not suited to being left alone for long periods. They form close bonds with their family.

The Gordon Setter is an intelligent and loyal companion when provided with proper activity levels and training. Their active, friendly nature makes them a delightful family dog for a busy household. They need plenty of exercise and interaction to keep their minds engaged and prevent problem behaviours from developing. With an outgoing and playful temperament, the Gordon Setter makes a beautiful sporting and family dog.

Gordon Setters are loyal to their family and will protect them at all costs. They are also good watchdogs.
Gordon Setters are intelligent dogs and are relatively easy to train. However, they can sometimes be stubborn, so early socialization and training are essential.

Education and Training

This Setter tends to be a peaceful, quiet and very accommodating dog. These qualities, combined with the outstanding loyalty and sense of belonging it tends to develop towards its family, make it a perfect dog even for first-timers.

The Setter Gordon’s temperament is generous and very expansive towards his owner, whom he loves viscerally. He does not tolerate being left alone, which makes him grumpy, timid and shy. It shows a certain mistrust towards strangers, sometimes even being fearful of other dogs.

For all these reasons, socialisation must be strongly considered from the puppy’s first months of life.

Here are some more details about educating and training a Gordon Setter:

  • Intelligence & Trainability: The Gordon Setter is a bright and responsive breed that aims to please their owner. They are ranked average in obedience & working intelligence compared to other species. With positive reinforcement training, they generally pick up on commands reasonably quickly.
  • Early Socialisation: Early socialisation is critical for Gordon Setter. Exposing them to a wide variety of people, dogs, environments, and experiences when young will help build confidence and prevent shyness or skittishness. Puppy kindergarten classes are highly recommended.
  • Obedience Training: Formal obedience training is vital for this energetic and excitable breed. It will teach them essential commands and instil focus. Training should be consistent and start early. Gordons respond best to positive reinforcement techniques.
  • Exercise Needs: Gordon Setters need 1-2 hours of vigorous exercise daily—a combination of long walks, running, hiking, swimming, and playing fetch. Without enough activity, they can become restless and destructive. Obedience training can serve as mental and physical exercise.
  • Hunting Instincts: Gordons have a strong hunting heritage. Many enjoy activities that tap into those instincts, like field trials, agility, scent work, and hunting birds. Not all need to pursue to be happy, though.
  • Challenge Them: Gordons thrive when given activities that challenge their intelligence. Advanced obedience, agility, and interactive toys/puzzles are great outlets for their mental and physical energy.

Proper training and exercise will help manage the Gordon Setter’s high energy levels and bring out their best qualities as loyal, friendly, and devoted companions. Their training must be consistent and reinforced throughout their lifetime.

Is it Suitable for Families and Children?

Gordon Setters are known for their gentle and loving nature.
They are good with children and other pets and make great family dogs.

The Gordon Setter can make an excellent family dog when properly trained, socialised, and exercised. Here are some key considerations regarding Gordons and families:

  • Energetic Nature: Their high energy level means Gordons need plenty of activity and exercise daily. Without outlets for their energy, they may become restless and destructive. Families must commit to providing vigorous daily exercise.
  • Size: Gordon Setters are a large breed, ranging from 24-27 inches tall and 45-80 lbs. Their size makes them best suited to homes with older, sturdier children rather than toddlers who could get accidentally knocked over.
  • Child Supervision: Gordon Setters is usually friendly, patient, and playful with children. However, children should always be supervised in their interactions, especially when playing rough or around food, where the dog may react instinctively.
  • Socialisation: Early and extensive socialisation is critical for Gordons to develop good manners and temperament around children and strangers. Participation in puppy classes can be constructive.
  • Prey Drive: Gordons may instinctively want to chase young children running and playing. Their hunting instincts need to be controlled.
  • Training: Obedience training and establishing rules and structure in the home is essential for this intelligent but energetic breed. This allows them to be well-behaved family members.
  • Attention Needs: Gordons crave attention and affection from their people. They don’t do well when frequently left alone for long periods.

With proper training, exercise, supervision, and socialisation, the Gordon Setter’s friendly, loyal, and playful nature can make them an excellent addition to an active family. Their high energy and size are something families need to consider seriously.

Care and Health

The Gordon Setter is a beautiful dog breed known for its elegance and energy, but he is prone to some health problems, such as:

  • Bloat: This life-threatening condition occurs when the stomach twists on itself. It is most common in deep-chested dogs like Gordon Setters.
  • Hip dysplasia: This is a condition in which the hip joint does not fit together correctly, which can lead to arthritis.
  • Elbow dysplasia: This is a similar condition that affects the elbow joint.
  • Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA): This inherited eye disease causes gradual vision loss.
  • Cerebellar abiotrophy: This rare neurological disorder can cause tremors, instability, and other problems.
  • Hypothyroidism: This is a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough hormones, which can lead to weight gain, hair loss, and other problems.

To ensure their well-being, consider the following care and health guidelines:

  1. Exercise: Gordon Setters are active dogs that require regular exercise to stay happy and healthy. Engage them in activities like long walks, jogging, or play sessions to expend energy.
  2. Diet: Provide a balanced diet appropriate for their age, size, and activity level. Consult your veterinarian for specific dietary recommendations and portion sizes.
  3. Grooming: Gordon Setters has a beautiful, silky coat that needs regular grooming to prevent matting and maintain its shine. Brush their coat several times weekly and check for any signs of skin issues or parasites.
  4. Health Check-ups: Regular veterinary check-ups are crucial to monitor your Gordon Setter’s overall health. Vaccinations, dental care, and preventive measures for common breed-specific health issues should be discussed with your vet.
  5. Training and Socialisation: Early training and socialisation are essential to ensure they grow into well-behaved dogs. Enroll in obedience classes and expose them to various people, animals, and situations.
  6. Love and Attention: Gordon Setters thrives on human companionship. Spend quality time with your dog, provide mental stimulation through toys and games, and offer plenty of affection.
  7. Safety: Ensure your home and outdoor areas are safe for your Gordon Setter. They are known to have a strong prey drive, so secure fences and keep an eye on them during outdoor activities.

Remember that each dog is unique, so tailor their care to their needs. Regular maintenance, attention, and a loving environment will contribute to a happy and healthy life for your Gordon Setter.

Feeding, The proper diet

As far as feeding is concerned, the Gordon Setter has no problems. Whether you give wet or dry food, you must decide which you prefer. Meat should be the main ingredient in both versions.

If you prefer raw food or want to try or prepare the food yourself, inform yourself carefully. So that your dog gets all the nutrients it needs.

Information on vegan feeding opinions on this topic is divided. However, it would be best to remember that your dog is descended from a wolf and was not created by evolution to be a pure herbivore.

Gordon Setter Lead Hook - 6 Hook Lead Tid
They make great gifts for dog lovers and an even better gift for yourself!
Gordon Setter Dog Metal Sign LED Lights, Custom Gordon Setter Sign, Gordon Setter Neon Sign, Gordon Setter Dog Neon Metal Wall Décor
Made from high-quality carbon steel and powder coated to last a lifetime.

Even if you do not eat meat, you should not ask your dog to do so. However, you can still be responsible when buying food and pay attention to sustainability.

The frequency with which you should feed your dog depends on its age. Puppies and young dogs should have four meals daily, while older dogs only need two. The idea that you should only feed an adult dog once daily is outdated.

The amount of food depends on the dog’s activity level. The feeding instructions provided by the manufacturer are only a rough guide. Therefore, check your Gordon’s weight regularly. If sufficiently stimulated, he is usually unlikely to gain too much weight.

Immediately after meals, you should accustom your Gordon Setter to resting so he can digest his food. This reduces the risk of the dreaded gastric torsion to which large dogs are particularly prone.

Grooming, Care of the Gordon Setter

The Gordon Setter has a medium-length coat and needs to be brushed regularly. It is best to use a standard dog brush. Tools that remove the undercoat can damage the upper jacket and should only be used by professionals.

Whether your dog should be bathed is also a controversial issue. In principle, you can clean your Gordon once a month. For this purpose, use a mild shampoo for dogs. In direction, however, a thorough brushing after walks is sufficient.

Like all setters, the Gordon has drooping ears. These can easily catch fire. This happens quickly, especially in hot and humid weather. It is, therefore, vital that you check your dog’s ears regularly.

Gordon Setters have a long, thick coat that needs to be brushed regularly to prevent mats.
They are a high-maintenance breed and require regular grooming. Their coat should be brushed at least once weekly and often during shedding season.

If dirty, you should clean them carefully with a unique clean lotion. If you cannot do this, your vet will happily show you how or do it for you.

You must also make sure that the claws do not become too long. This can happen if your dog mainly walks on soft ground. It can also occur if your dog can no longer take long walks because of age.

In this case, you must shorten your dog’s claw with special pliers. This work also requires some practice to avoid injury. Again, ask your vet or groomer for advice if you are unsure.

Final thoughts

Here’s a summary of key points to consider if you’re thinking of getting a Gordon Setter:

The Gordon Setter can make a wonderful family dog for an active household prepared to meet their high activity needs with plenty of daily vigorous exercise. Their friendly, loyal temperament and playfulness with children are appealing. However, their larger size means they may accidentally knock over tiny toddlers, so supervision is vital.

This breed is energetic and needs 1-2 hours of exercise daily, including long walks, running, swimming, etc. Without sufficient outlets for their energy, they can become destructive or neurotic. Training and mental stimulation are also crucial for this intelligent breed.

Early and extensive socialization is critical to developing a stable, well-rounded Gordon Setter comfortable in various environments and around new people. Participation in puppy classes can kickstart this process. Establishing rules, structure and obedience training from a young age is also essential.

Gordon Setters thrive when they can be close to their family. They don’t do well when left alone for long periods regularly. They have a strong prey drive that needs to be controlled around children or other pets.

A Gordon Setter can be a delightful family companion but requires an active household committed to adequate exercise, training, socialization and attention. When these high needs are met, they make loyal, friendly dogs that adapt well to family life. Their energy and size are something families must seriously consider.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

Affiliate Disclosure: The Frenchie Breed website may receive a small commission from the proceeds of any product(s) sold through affiliate and direct partner links at no cost to you.

Follow Frenchie Breed on Google News

+ posts

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

Leave a Reply

What do you think?

201 Points
Upvote Downvote

Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

Natural Remedies for Dog Itchy Skin: Say Goodbye to Pet Discomfort.

Top 5 Natural Remedies For Itchy Dog Skin

ZEUS the Great Dane: Remembering the World's Tallest Dog.

Remembering ZEUS: The World’s Tallest Great Dane’s Journey and Tragic End