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Golden Retriever Guide England: Owning the Perfect Family Dog

Everything you need to know about the Golden Retriever! Discover why they’re Britain’s favorite breed, from history & care to pros & cons. Find your perfect furry friend!

The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the world, endowed with a calm personality. As such, it is ideal for active families with children.

The Golden Retriever in England is a well-known dog breed from Scotland that is bred as a hunting dog for game retrieval. Today, Golden Retrievers are often kept as companion dogs and are loved for their friendly, docile and social nature. They are intelligent and trainable animals, suitable for various tasks, such as therapy and assistance work. Read what you can expect when buying a Golden Retriever puppy.

Breed History

The Golden Retriever originated in the Scottish Highlands in the late 19th century. The breed was developed by Lord Tweedmouth, who wanted to create the ideal gundog. He crossed yellow wavy-coated retrievers with Tweed Water Spaniels to produce the Golden Retriever. The breed was popularised in Britain by the 3rd Lord Tweedmouth in the 1920s and was recognised by The Kennel Club in 1911. Golden Retrievers were brought to America in the early 20th century and were recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1925. They quickly became popular as hunting dogs, guide dogs and family pets.

Appearance and Characteristics

Golden Retrievers are medium-large dogs standing 56-61 cm tall at the withers. They have symmetrical bodies with a level topline and proudly carried heads. Golden Retrievers have friendly, intelligent expressions created by their broad heads, almond-shaped dark brown eyes and small triangular ears. Their water-repellent double coat is gold to cream in colour and moderately wavy or flat. Golden Retrievers are strong, athletic dogs with muscular necks and legs. Their otter-like tail is carried level with the back.

Price and maintenance

Golden Retrievers, like all dog breeds, can be prone to certain health problems. One of the most common health problems in Golden Retrievers is hip dysplasia. This is a condition in which the hip joints are not properly developed, which can cause pain and stiffness.
The Golden retriever may also suffer from skin allergies, resulting in itching and inflammation of the skin. Allergens, such as food, or environmental factors, such as pollen or mites, can cause it.

Golden Retriever puppies generally cost £800 to £1200. Annual costs for a Golden Retriever, including food, vet bills, insurance and toys/treats, come to around £1000-£1500. Golden Retrievers require at least 60 minutes of exercise daily and regular grooming to keep their coat in good condition. Their friendly nature makes them adaptable to different living situations, but they do best with access to a garden.

Pros and cons of the breed

  • Pros: Intelligent, eager to please, great family dogs, excellent with children, friendly towards people and pets, easy to train, multipurpose – great therapy, assistance and working dogs.
  • Cons: Require a lot of exercise, prone to obesity if overfed and under-exercised, high grooming requirements, shed a lot year-round, need plenty of mental stimulation to avoid destructive behaviour, apt to specific health issues like cancer and hip/elbow dysplasia.

Character and sociability

Golden Retrievers have kind, eager-to-please personalities. They are brilliant, friendly and exceptionally patient. Golden Retrievers form strong bonds with their owners and aim to be constant companions. They get along well with people and other dogs. Golden Retrievers love children and are gentle with them. Their friendly nature makes them poor guard dogs.

The breed, in general

Golden Retrievers can live happily in a small house, as long as they have access to a decent yard or can go for numerous walks.
All retriever breeds explore the world using their mouths and teeth. So make sure you give your Golden Retriever plenty of toys to chew on. If you don’t, shoes, children’s toys, or potted plants can become his pastime.

Often considered the quintessential family dog, Golden Retrievers are one of the most popular breeds in Britain and worldwide. They excel as a guide, therapy, detection, search, and rescue dogs due to their trainability, intelligence, and versatility. While capable of hunting dogs and competitors in dog sports, most Goldens are happy-go-lucky companion dogs. Their popularity stems from their devoted, loving nature and desire to spend time with their families.

Care and Health Golden

Retrievers need at least 60 minutes daily to stay fit and prevent boredom. A securely fenced garden is ideal as they love to run and play. Their water-repellent coats mean daily brushing is sufficient. Goldens thrive on positive reinforcement training and structured obedience starting from puppyhood. Common health issues include cancer, hip and elbow dysplasia, heart problems and eye conditions. Responsible breeders screen breeding dogs. With proper diet, exercise, veterinary care and affection, Goldens live 10-12 years.

Dog training

Golden Retriever puppies are brilliant and eager to please but can be boisterous. Kind, consistent training using positive reinforcement works best. Socialisation from an early age is vital to develop a well-adjusted, non-reactive adult. Goldens excel at obedience, agility and other dog sports. Their high food motivation makes training easy by using treats and praise. Retrievers respond best to short, engaging training sessions to hold their interest. Harsh corrections should be avoided.

Conclusion

The friendly, devoted Golden Retriever has good reason for being one of Britain’s most beloved breeds. Their trainability, versatility, and winning personality make them excellent family companions. With proper care, exercise and training, the good-natured Golden makes a loyal pet for novice and experienced owners.

  1. The Golden Retriever Club UK
  2. Golden Retriever Breed Council
  3. NORTHWEST GOLDEN RETRIEVER CLUB 

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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