in ,

Get Rid of Bad Dog Breath: Causes, Remedies and Tooth Brushing Tips

Bad breath? Let’s discover natural treats that are good for your health.

A dog's halitosis may be a symptom of an underlying problem or it may be related to nutrition and poor oral hygiene.

Dog bad breath. For dogs and cats, bad breath (halitosis) is undoubtedly a problem of coexistence with their owners. Still, it is a health problem that should not be underestimated and addressed in good time with natural, effective and safe remedies.

Our friends also suffer from halitosis.

Bad breath emanating persistently from the mouth? The first thing to do is not to consider it a ‘natural‘ characteristic of our four-legged friends, nor even a problem limited to our living with them.

Halitosis (the technical term for bad breath) is, in fact, a medical problem: an alarm bell of an undisturbed accumulation of plaque and tartar and, therefore, of bad oral hygiene, but, even worse, an early sign of progressive inflammation of the oral cavity (gingivitis, periodontitis and stomatitis) of which halitosis is not only a symptom ‘under the nose’ of the owner, but also a trigger cause.

What causes bad breath is, in fact, the millions of bacteria in dental plaque: a concentrate of more than 300 different types of microorganisms, which degrade the proteins contained in food and saliva and, in doing so, generate large quantities of sulphur compounds. They are directly responsible for the foul smell emanating from the unclean mouths of dogs and cats.

These particles always directly damage the oral tissues and trigger painful dental inflammations, from which 91% of dogs and 85% of cats over three years of age suffer. For this reason, halitosis must be considered a natural ‘litmus test’ of the state of hygiene and health of the mouth of our four-legged friends.

Tooth brushing is the gold standard.

Bad breath, in medical terms referred to as 'halitosis', is a frequently encountered problem in dogs and cats and the vet is often consulted to remedy it.
The most frequent cause of halitosis is teeth! Tartar is ubiquitous in our animal friends, and as for us, it is nothing more than the hardening of the bacterial layer that forms on the teeth.

Alongside veterinary check-ups and the periodic professional removal of plaque and tartar (mineralised plaque), tooth brushing is an excellent daily hygiene practice that should begin as soon as the final teeth appear.

If our friend has been accustomed to ‘having his hands in his mouth‘ since childhood, it will undoubtedly be easy to convince him to brush his teeth for a few minutes daily.

Then, using special precautions and toothbrushes and kinds of toothpaste specially designed for their mouths, brushing our dog or cat’s teeth will become an integral part of those ‘good habits‘ of daily hygiene necessary for us and them.

Difficult brushing your dog’s and cat’s teeth?

Today, we have methods to accompany even occasional tooth brushing to help control plaque and tartar and improve halitosis in our animal friends.

Alongside oral health diets and systems aimed at encouraging proper chewing, research in animal health has led to the development of innovative solutions to help keep the mouths of our four-legged companions healthy and clean.

One of the most exciting advances is treats based on plant components such as Ascophyllum Nodosum, a unique brown seaweed harvested sustainably in the North Seas. Clinical studies have shown that this extraordinary natural ingredient has an anti-plaque and anti-tartar action when administered orally.

Once absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, Ascophyllum Nodosum concentrates in the animal’s saliva, performing a dual action: it inhibits the adhesion and growth of plaque bacteria. It reduces tartar deposition under its buffering effect on salivary pH.

Using oral health premiums based on Ascophylium Nodosum is vital for keeping Fido and Micio’s mouth healthy. Investing in our pets’ oral health is an act of love reflected in the joy, comfort and vitality they give us daily.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

Affiliate Disclosure: The Frenchie Breed website may receive a small commission from the proceeds of any product(s) sold through affiliate and direct partner links at no cost to you.

Follow Frenchie Breed on Google News

+ posts

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

Leave a Reply

What do you think?

239 Points
Upvote Downvote

Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

The most effective technique is to apply a small amount of toothpaste on one finger, then present it to the dog; when it has sniffed and licked the product, you can gently smear the remainder into the animal's mouth, running your finger over the teeth and gums.

How Do You Get Your Dog Used To Using Toothbrush and Toothpaste?

It takes time, but with perseverance and commitment, you can easily teach your dog to sit still.

Teaching Your Dog the Emergency Stop Command