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Dog Bleeding from Anus: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Faeces with the presence of blood are often of great concern to the owner, as they are associated with significant diseases such as tumours or are more simply thought of as haemorrhoids as in human medicine. Fortunately, it can often be less severe than it seems, but let us begin by differentiating haematochezia and melena.

The article provides a good overview of the most common causes of rectal bleeding in dogs, but it's important to note that it's not a substitute for professional veterinary advice.

Dog bleeding from anus. A haemorrhage, wherever it occurs, is always cause for alarm for owners since blood is rightly associated with danger. A bleeding from the anus can have various causes, so the correct diagnosis, which is always the responsibility of the vet, depends on the type of treatment to be followed. In the following, we will look at the most probable causes for the leakage of blood from the dog’s anus, differentiating whether the blood comes from the rectum or the digestive system or even from the respiratory system due to swallowing.

Dog digestive system

The anus constitutes the final part of the digestive system that begins in the mouth, continues into the oesophagus and continues into the stomach, the small and then the large intestine until it reaches the rectum, of which the anus is the termination. Bleeding anywhere in the system, but also in the nasal cavities or lungs, will be expelled through the anus.

The dog's digestive system includes the teeth, oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and rectum. The pancreas and liver also contribute to the digestive process, but are not considered parts of the digestive system, as food does not come into contact with these organs.

As we have said, the points from which blood loss can originate are so many that one must pay attention to specific details to understand the diagnosis. One must distinguish between haematochezia and Melena. In the first case, the blood will be bright red, as the blood is fresh and can appear either with normal stools or diarrhoea. This bleeding in the dog’s stools usually comes from the colon, rectum or anus, so it is local. On the other hand, Melena is a type of haemorrhage with dark, thickened, digested blood, which will give colour to the stools, which can also be black. To know where the bleeding is coming from, it is also important to note whether the faeces are mixed with blood or whether the blood covers them. We will focus on the latter because the blood comes from the rectum.

We will look at the most common causes in the following paragraphs.

Bleeding from the dog’s anus due to constipation

We begin this list of causes for bleeding from the anus due to constipation, i.e. the animal’s difficulty in evacuating faeces, which it excretes in small quantities and with difficulty. Haemorrhage occurs during this effort, the causes of which are various. For example, dehydration can lead to dry faeces, which makes expulsion difficult. On the other hand, when the dog eats bones, tissues or other substances that are impossible to digest, stools that have the consistency of a stone are formed. Certain medications can also cause constipation as a side effect, and diseases such as hypothyroidism are sometimes the cause of chronic constipation. In some cases, the pain they experience may inhibit the dog from defecating, making the situation worse.

In most cases constipation in dogs presents itself with the need to defecate more frequently, but to no avail. Sometimes the dog only manages to excrete faeces in the form of small, hard balls, often accompanied by pain. These may also be expelled with blood or mucus.

If you notice blood from the anus or pain when defecating or straining to do so, you should consult your vet so that he can determine the cause of the problem and then treat the constipation in the best possible way. Constipation can be prevented by taking the following preventive measures:

  • Proper nutrition and hydration facilitate proper intestinal transit.
  • Avoid offering bones to the dog.
  • Regular veterinary check-ups that can recognise any pathologies in good time.
  • Keep the dog in a safe environment to prevent it from ingesting foreign bodies.
  • NEVER give your dog medication on your initiative, but consult your vet.
  • Offer your dog a dynamic lifestyle that facilitates his intestinal regularity through walks and exercise.

Bleeding from the dog’s anus by anal glands

The dog has anal glands, sacs located on either side of the anus. When faeces come out, they exert pressure on them and, in this way, secrete a liquid that helps lubricate the anus, as well as emitting an odour characteristic of each dog. Sometimes these glands can become infected, one or both, which can cause bleeding from the anus. In this case, the dog is in great pain and will emit yellowish or bloody faeces. You may notice that the dog rubs its anus against the ground or licks the area. You should contact your vet, who will empty the glands and administer an antibiotic course to the animal.

The information on constipation, anal gland issues, and vomiting is particularly helpful for pet owners.

When you notice these symptoms but the inflammation is confined to one gland, it may be an abscess, which can ulcerate to produce an anal fistula from which purulent fluid with an unpleasant odour will come out. In such cases, it is a good idea to visit the vet as soon as possible, as surgery may be necessary. Complete disinfection and antibiotic treatment are required to treat abscesses.

Below are some ways to distinguish them.

  1. In haematochezia, the blood in the dog’s faeces is bright red, which means it is fresh and most likely comes from the lower intestines, usually the colon or rectum. It may be mixed in the dog’s faeces or drops of blood immediately after defecation.
  2. In Melena, the blood in the faeces appears dark and tarry, similar to black asphalt, thus indicating that the blood has already been digested and possibly comes from the upper intestinal tract.

Usually, but not always, melena is more worrisome than an occasional case of haematochezia. Melena is often not as easily recognisable as haematochezia because dogs may often have dark faeces, which does not necessarily mean they contain blood.

The dog bleeds from the anus and vomits.

Suppose you notice that your dog is bleeding from the anus but at the same time vomiting; this may be a different disorder from the ones we have seen so far. A veterinary consultation is essential in such cases. The causes of blood loss could be:

  • Ulcers – These are lesions of the mucous membrane of the digestive system, often caused by consuming corticosteroid medicines or others for diseases such as kidney or liver failure. In the most severe cases, these ulcers cause vomiting, anaemia, slimming, and Melena. They require veterinary treatment.
  • Parvovirus mainly affects puppies and is characterised by vomiting and diarrhoea with blood. It is a severe and contagious viral disease with no cure, only supportive treatment, so vaccination is essential for prevention.
  • Intoxication – Ingestion of toxic substances can cause symptoms such as rectal bleeding and vomiting with blood. Immediate medical attention is required, as the dog’s life is in danger.
  • Heatstroke – An excessive and sudden rise in your dog’s body temperature produces vomiting and diarrhoea with blood, among other symptoms. This happens, for instance, when you leave your dog inside the car during the hottest hours. It can lead to death and, therefore, requires prompt veterinary attention.
  • Kidney failure – A blockage in the functioning of the kidneys can cause symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea with blood due to the resulting gastrointestinal bleeding. It requires veterinary treatment to stabilise them and then frequent monitoring.

First Aid Tips for Dog Bleeding from Anus

Disclaimer: While these tips can be helpful in the immediate aftermath of noticing your dog bleeding from the anus, it’s crucial to seek veterinary attention as soon as possible. A veterinarian can accurately diagnose the cause and provide the necessary treatment to ensure your dog’s health and well-being.

1. Stay Calm and Assess the Situation:

First and foremost, take a deep breath and assess the situation. Panicking won’t help your dog, so remain calm and composed. Observe the bleeding:

  • Colour: Is the blood bright red, dark maroon, or black? Bright red indicates fresh bleeding, while darker shades suggest older internal bleeding.
  • Amount: Is it a few drops or a significant amount? Excessive bleeding needs immediate veterinary attention.
  • Frequency: Is this the first time you’ve noticed it, or has it been happening for a while?

2. Restrict Activity and Apply Gentle Pressure:

Gently restrain your dog to prevent further straining or activity that could worsen the bleeding. If the bleeding is localised around the anus, apply gentle pressure with a clean, absorbent cloth or gauze pad to help control it. Avoid inserting anything into the rectum.

3. Monitor Your Dog:

Keep a close eye on your dog for other symptoms like vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy, abdominal pain, or difficulty defecating. Note down any changes you observe to inform the veterinarian.

4. Keep Your Dog Hydrated:

Offer your dog small amounts of water to prevent dehydration, especially if they’re vomiting or experiencing diarrhoea.

5. Avoid Home Remedies:

Don’t give your dog any human medications or attempt home remedies without consulting your veterinarian. This could potentially worsen the situation or interfere with proper diagnosis and treatment.

6. Contact Your Veterinarian Immediately:

Regardless of the severity of the bleeding, it’s crucial to contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. They can properly diagnose the cause of the bleeding and provide the necessary treatment. Early intervention is key to ensuring your dog’s speedy recovery.

Remember: These are just first-aid tips, and veterinary attention is always essential when your dog is experiencing any health issues.

Additional Tips:

  • Keep a pet first-aid kit handy for emergencies.
  • Regularly check your dog’s stool for any abnormalities.
  • Schedule routine veterinary check-ups to maintain your dog’s overall health and well-being.

By following these tips and seeking prompt veterinary care, you can help your dog through this stressful situation and ensure their speedy recovery.

Note: This article is purely informative; here at Frenchie Breed, we have no authority to prescribe veterinary treatment or make any diagnosis. We encourage you to take your pet to the vet as soon as possible if it presents discomfort or discomfort!

Q&As:

What are the potential causes of a dog bleeding from the anus?

Causes can vary, but potential reasons include constipation, anal gland infections, ulcers, parvovirus, intoxication, heatstroke, and kidney failure.

How can constipation lead to bleeding from a dog’s anus?

Constipation can result from factors like dehydration, ingestion of indigestible substances (e.g., bones), certain medications, or underlying diseases like hypothyroidism. The straining during constipation can cause bleeding.

What are the signs of anal gland issues in a dog?

Signs include pain during defecation, rubbing the anus on the ground, licking the anal area, emitting yellowish or bloody faeces, and potential abscess formation, which may require surgical intervention.

When should a dog owner consult a vet for anal bleeding and vomiting in their dog?

Immediate veterinary consultation is necessary when a dog is bleeding from the anus and vomiting. Possible causes include ulcers, parvovirus, intoxication, heatstroke, or kidney failure, all of which require prompt attention.

How can dog owners prevent constipation in their pets?

Preventive measures include proper nutrition and hydration, avoiding giving bones to the dog, regular veterinary check-ups, maintaining a safe environment to prevent ingestion of foreign bodies, avoiding self-administration of medication, and providing a dynamic lifestyle through walks and exercise.

Takeaways:

  1. Causes of Anal Bleeding: Potential causes of a dog bleeding from the anus include constipation, anal gland issues, ulcers, parvovirus, intoxication, heatstroke, and kidney failure.
  2. Constipation: It can result from factors like dehydration, ingestion of indigestible substances, certain medications, or underlying diseases like hypothyroidism. Straining during constipation may lead to bleeding.
  3. Anal Gland Issues: Signs include pain during defecation, rubbing the anus on the ground, licking the anal area, emitting yellowish or bloody faeces, and potential abscess formation.
  4. Consulting a Vet: Immediate veterinary attention is crucial if a dog is bleeding from the anus and vomiting. Possible causes include ulcers, parvovirus, intoxication, heatstroke, or kidney failure.
  5. Prevention of Constipation: Measures include proper nutrition and hydration, avoiding giving bones to the dog, regular veterinary check-ups, maintaining a safe environment, preventing self-administration of medication, and providing a dynamic lifestyle.

Comparison Table:

CausesSymptomsTreatment
ConstipationDifficulty in evacuating faeces, strainingVomiting, diarrhoea with blood, excessive body temperature rise
Anal Gland IssuesPain during defecation, rubbing, licking, abscess formationVeterinary consultation, gland emptying, antibiotics, possible surgery
UlcersVomiting, bloody diarrhoea, highly contagiousVeterinary treatment, identification of underlying cause, supportive care
ParvovirusVeterinary consultation, treatment of the underlying cause, preventive measuresVomiting, anaemia, weight loss, and severe cases may show Melena
IntoxicationRectal bleeding, vomiting with bloodImmediate veterinary attention, removal of toxic substance
HeatstrokeVomiting, diarrhoea with blood, gastrointestinal bleedingImmediate veterinary attention, cooling measures
Kidney FailureVeterinary treatment, stabilisation, monitoringVeterinary treatment, stastabilisationonitoring

Reputable veterinary websites for more information:

  1. The Avenue Veterinary Clinic
  2. PDSA Pet Wellbeing Centre
  3. GoVets
  4. Yew Tree Veterinary Surgery
  5. Medivet

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

Affiliate Disclosure: The Frenchie Breed website may receive a small commission from the proceeds of any product(s) sold through affiliate and direct partner links at no cost to you.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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