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Czechoslovakian Wolfdog: Origins, Appearance, Training & Care Guide

The Czechoslovakian black, also known as the wolfdog, is a large working dog breed originally bred for border patrol in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. As the name suggests, the Czechoslovakian wolfdog resembles a wolf in body shape, movement, coat texture, coat colour, and facial markings. These dogs make excellent working dogs and are used for jobs including search and rescue, herding, dog sports, tracking, and more.

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, a captivating canine from a cross between German Shepherds and Carpathian wolves, boasts a lineage unlike any other. Bred in the 1950s in Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic and Slovakia) for their exceptional working abilities, these dogs quickly gained recognition for their strength, intelligence, and loyalty.

Origins

An alert, primitive canine that resembles a wolf in appearance. They are brilliant, powerful, active, loyal and devoted to their owner. They have superior eyesight, hearing and sense of smell and are known for having excellent stamina and endurance.

Various crossbreeds have been attempted over the years. The first litter was born in 1958, resulting from a mating between the German Shepherd Cesar Z Brezoveho Haje and the she-wolf Brita. Naturally, it was the subject of in-depth studies, especially to understand the anatomical and physiological differences compared to its parents and whether the pups were ready to be trained and collaborate with humans.

In 1965, after the end of the experiment, a plan was prepared for the breeding of the new breed, which was recognised in 1982 as a national breed by the General Council of the Breeders’ Association of the then Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. According to the Fel classification, it belongs to Group 1 (Shepherd Dogs and Bovarians, excluding Swiss Bovarians), Section 1 (Shepherd Dogs).

Initially, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog was selected to create a robust and hardy dog that was also easily trainable to be used as an auxiliary in the Czechoslovakian border guard.

Today, this working breed impresses and fascinates many dog lovers, who often adopt a Czechoslovakian Wolfhound puppy to have it as a companion in their everyday lives.

The Czechoslovakian wolfdog has retained many of the wolf’s physical characteristics: it is resistant to fatigue, has highly developed eyesight and sense of orientation, and retains the typical wolf-like appearance.

Appearance and Characteristics

The Czechoslovakian wolf is an above-average-sized dog with a very wolf-like appearance. Its constitution is solid, with strong ligaments and muscular limbs.

The height at withers in males is at least 65 cm and in females 60 cm. Its weight starts at a minimum of 26 kg for males and 20 kg for females. The head, which closely resembles the wolf, is symmetrical, muscular, and has a blunt wedge shape. The teeth, well developed, have a scissor or pincer bite.

The eyes, narrow and oblique, are light in colour, often amber. The neck is muscular, as is the rest of the body. The tail is set high and hangs loosely downwards, except when the dog is excited, it rises like a sickle. The limbs are firm and parallel.

The feet have well-developed, elastic, dark-coloured pads. The trot of the Czechoslovakian Wolfhound is harmonious, agile, loose, and tireless. Various endurance tests have shown that these dogs can successfully cope with a distance of up to 100 km.

The coat is solid and smooth; the undercoat becomes predominant in winter, and the cover coat forms a thick layer all over the body. The colour ranges from yellowish-grey to silver-grey and has a light mask characteristic of the breed.

Character

The Czechoslovakian Wolf is playful, lively, exuberant, and tenacious. It has retained the wolf’s cunning and adaptability to various situations. Capable of interpreting its human companion’s moods and emotions on the fly, it barks very little but can make itself perfectly understood. The Czechoslovakian wolf’s strong temperament, liveliness, and highly developed senses stand out.

The Czechoslovak Wolfdog is lively, active, capable of endurance, and docile with quick reactions. It is fearless, courageous, and suspicious, yet does not attack without cause. It shows tremendous loyalty towards its master. Resistant to weather conditions.

An excellent guard and defence dog, it is very close to its pack, so it does not like to spend too much time alone. It often bonds with a particular family member, whom it recognises as its point of reference. If socialised well and managed correctly, it can also accept other pets of other species without any problems.

However, its attitude is different when it comes to unfamiliar animals or people: in that case, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog will tend to consider them intruders unless we make it understand otherwise. Suppose we have established a good relationship of cooperation and mutual trust. In that case, making our Czechoslovakian Wolfhound accept relatives, friends, and any of their animals will not be difficult.

Training

As a knowledgeable dog with a short reaction time, it is essential always to provide it with new stimuli and ensure that it is involved and intrigued in all our proposed activities. The Czechoslovakian wolf can try its hand at dog sports in which its physical abilities can be brought to the fore. His excellent sense of smell also makes him very suitable for track work, where he can achieve significant results.

Nutrition and health

In conclusion, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog presents a unique blend of domestic dogs and wild wolves, captivating enthusiasts with its intelligence, trainability, and striking resemblance to its wild ancestors. While their independent spirit necessitates experienced owners, these dogs can flourish in the right environment, becoming cherished companions and loyal working partners. Owning a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog comes with great responsibility, but the rewards are unparalleled for those prepared to provide the care and training these remarkable animals require.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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