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Common Tail Injuries in Dogs and How to Prevent Them

Dog tail fracture or injury and symptoms.

Dog tail injuries are widespread in dogs because the tail is the body part most expressive after a dog’s face. So, the chances of getting an injury are very high because keeping a check on their back and being careful are not a dog’s natural traits.

If you think your dog has a tail injury, know the exact location and cause behind the wound to find the best possible solution. Because there is so much damage in a dog’s tail, being precise is very important.

So, If you think your dog has any tail injuries or may get any tail injuries in the future, then you can look for them below because these are the most common tail injuries that a dog may get:

1. Happy Tail

It is precisely what the name says. A happy tail is an injury that occurs when your dog is delighted and is moving its tail, which may hit against other hard things, leading to an injury. Your dog may hit its bottom with surfaces like a wall, chairs, etc. This hard-hitting may lead to damage that causes deep wounds.

A happy tail injury needs to be covered with a bandage so that the wound gets as much protection as possible. If you take your dog to the vet, they may even suggest using an Elizabethan collar so that your dog cannot reach its tail to lick or chew it.

If your dog does not control its constant wagging and hitting on hard surfaces, the happy tail may become severe, requiring surgical treatments to help with pain and injury.

2. Limp Tail

It is an injury that is typically seen in dogs who work. It happens between a dog’s legs, or sometimes the entire tail is up, but the tip is drooping. Muscle straining in the tail leads to a limp tail. It usually happens when dogs wag their tail more often and express their happiness and excitement by intensely moving their seat.

You may find your dog chewing its tail, which may even cause swelling; your dog may find it painful to sit or stand, and it may even feel pain whenever it moves its tail. The vet may do x-rays to see the fractures in its tail. Your dog needs to rest if it has a limp tail injury.

Tail function in dogs.
The tail is a crucial part of the dog because our four-legged friend’s emotions reach us through it.

3. Biting or Chewing the Tail

Biting or chewing the tail will cause swelling and may lead to hair loss in that area. If your dog feels any sensation in its tail, like itching or pain, it may start chewing or biting it. Stress may even cause chewing of the bottom. However, if chewing is causing hair loss due to itching, it may be a sign of allergies.

Another reason for chewing its tail can be stud tail, in which extra sebum is produced from oil glands in its tail skin. Overproduction will cause discomfort, and your dog will start chewing its tail to eliminate the feeling.

Male dogs not given proper neutering usually deal with this excess sebum production, leading to a stud tail.

4. Hot Spots On Tail

Allergies or insect bites lead to causing hot spots. Moist dermatitis is another name for hot spots on the tail. Your dog may start licking and chewing its tail because of the inflammation in its skin cells. If your dog keeps on licking and chewing on its tail, it may cause more prominent hot spots on its tail.

Hair loss and infections come with constant licking and chewing. Cleaning the tail with hot spots is an essential treatment. It is best to clip the fur where there are hot spots and clean them with antiseptic solutions. After that, medicines are applied to relieve the pain and treat the area.

Hot spots can occur repeatedly if the underlying cause is not treated correctly. So, it is essential to take multiple tests to determine the real motivation behind the hot spots on your dog’s tail.

5. Anal Gland Conditions

Anal gland problems are very close to a dog’s tail. So, if anything happens around the anal area, its tail may get issues too. Parasites in the intestines cause irritation and inflammation on the tail and the anus. Taking your dog to the vet when anal gland conditions occur is very important.

Diarrhoea, weight loss, vomiting, scooting, persistent chewing, and live worms near the anus show that your dog needs the vet as soon as possible. The vet will take some parasite tests and find the proper treatment for your dog.

6. Masses, Growths, and Swelling

If you see any cysts, abscesses, tumours, or trauma on your dog’s tail, just know that you must take your dog to the vet as soon as possible. These growths or masses can be very painful and sometimes not painful.

If you see these growths, masses, or swellings that do not go away within five to seven days and your dog is in pain, you must take your dog to the vet. You may even notice that these growths or swelling are growing and worsening, leading to discolouration and bleeding.

7. Abrasions

Abrasions happen when your dog rubs its tail with a rough surface, causing severe trauma to the bottom, which leads to hair loss and red skin. Keeping the area clean and using an Elizabethan collar to prevent your dog from licking its tail is vital. If it gets worse, visit the vet immediately.

8. Lacerations

These wounds are pretty deep and even affect the muscles or nerves in your dog’s tail. It always happens because of the tail wagging and hitting hard surfaces. Take your dog to the vet if you see any blood on its tail.

9. Degloving

Injuries such as degloving are prevalent among dogs and may require proper cleaning whenever it occur. This injury exposes the nerves and tissues, which require treatment by covering them with bandages and making your dog wear an Elizabethan collar so that it cannot chew or lick the area. Take your dog to the vet as soon as possible when degloving happens.

10. Tail Fractures

DOG TAIL PROBLEMS: COMMON TRAUMAS AND PATHOLOGIES.
The tail is very sensitive because it is an extension of the spinal column and is rich in nerve endings.

Tail fractures are also common in dogs because they might get a fracture without knowing, such as falling or getting their tail stuck in a door. By touching the tail, you can quickly tell that it is a fracture. So, take your dog to the vet whenever fractures happen instead of treating them at home.

11. Avulsion

Pulling your dog’s tail, which leads to severe nerve stretching and breaking, is avulsion. This nerve stretches, and damage may lead to urine and faecal problems. Sometimes, it returns to normal with time, but in most cases, the nerve damage is irreversible.

Conclusion

There are many types of tail injuries, and it becomes difficult to understand what your dog is going through if you are unaware of its kind of injury. A dog’s most common tail injuries are a happy tail, limp tail, biting and chewing, hot spots, anal gland problems, growths, swellings, fractures, degloving, avulsion, abrasions, and lacerations.

You need to take care of your dog according to its injury because a tail injury of any type may lead to severe problems if it does not get proper treatment. If you see any severe damage or swelling, take your dog to the vet immediately for appropriate treatment.

Thank you for reading the article to the end. Your reading contribution was significant to us.

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The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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Written by Frenchie Breed

The "Frenchie Breed" website is a blog aimed at dog owners. We regularly publish articles about our four-legged furry friends. Among the contents of our blog, you will find ample space on the latest news in the sector, with information and in-depth analysis dedicated to the world of dogs in all its forms, the latest trends and news of the moment, curious facts, events devoted to dogs, product reviews, as well as an intense activity of information regarding the health and well-being of pets.

Please Note: The articles in the 'Frenchie Breed Blog' are for information purposes only; nothing published can or should be construed as an attempt to offer professional advice or consultation with a physician, veterinary surgeon or another health professional.

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